Features of Protein Fuctions

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brunazamith
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Features of Protein Fuctions

Post by brunazamith » Fri Sep 08, 2017 12:28 pm

Hello!

I need to extract features of protein functions. They are organized in a hierarchy, so one way that I thought about solving this issue was representing each node of this hierarchy as a vector containing its path from root. Something like this: https://imgur.com/a/gmvTv

I would like to know if anyone knows another way of extracting features of protein functions, hopefully something more related to biology, but I accept any suggestion. Thank you really much!

rahilsaxena
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Re: Features of Protein Fuctions

Post by rahilsaxena » Tue Dec 11, 2018 10:33 am

Proteins are the most versatile macromolecules in living systems and serve crucial functions in essentially all biological processes. They function as catalysts, they transport and store other molecules such as oxygen, they provide mechanical support and immune protection, they generate movement, they transmit nerve impulses, and they control growth and differentiation. Indeed, much of this text will focus on understanding what proteins do and how they perform these functions.

Several key properties enable proteins to participate in such a wide range of functions.

1. Proteins are linear polymers built of monomer units called amino acids. The construction of a vast array of macromolecules from a limited number of monomer building blocks is a recurring theme in biochemistry. Does protein function depend on the linear sequence of amino acids? The function of a protein is directly dependent on its threedimensional structure. Remarkably, proteins spontaneously fold up into three-dimensional structures that are determined by the sequence of amino acids in the protein polymer. Thus, proteins are the embodiment of the transition from the one-dimensional world of sequences to the three-dimensional world of molecules capable of diverse activities.

2. Proteins contain a wide range of functional groups. These functional groups include alcohols, thiols, thioethers, carboxylic acids, carboxamides, and a variety of basic groups. When combined in various sequences, this array of functional groups accounts for the broad spectrum of protein function. For instance, the chemical reactivity associated with these groups is essential to the function of enzymes, the proteins that catalyze specific chemical reactions in biological systems.

3. Proteins can interact with one another and with other biological macromolecules to form complex assemblies. The proteins within these assemblies can act synergistically to generate capabilities not afforded by the individual component proteins. These assemblies include macro-molecular machines that carry out the accurate replication of DNA, the transmission of signals within cells, and many other essential processes.

4. Some proteins are quite rigid, whereas others display limited flexibility. Rigid units can function as structural elements in the cytoskeleton (the internal scaffolding within cells) or in connective tissue. Parts of proteins with limited flexibility may act as hinges, springs, and levers that are crucial to protein function, to the assembly of proteins with one another and with other molecules into complex units, and to the transmission of information within and between cells.
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