Search found 65 matches

by SororSaudade
Wed Jan 17, 2007 2:26 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: agarose gel
Replies: 7
Views: 7068

I don't know how because i've never done it :P

just to add something to my previous answer... I belive ethidium bromide is heat degradable and I can't see any advantage in adding it to the TBE solution, but I might be missing something...
by SororSaudade
Wed Jan 17, 2007 1:58 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: agarose gel
Replies: 7
Views: 7068

i've never heard of that, but how do they melt the agarose? Aren't ethidium bromide vapours a little bit dangerous?
I usually do it the way you described (but with TBE 1x) and I know that some people run the gel without ethidium bromide and after the run place it in an ethidium bromide solution.
by SororSaudade
Sat Jan 13, 2007 2:58 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: dna storage
Replies: 10
Views: 5907

what I ment is that I prefer to use buffers (in this case tris pH=8 ) to avoid problems in the next steps.
And I also pointed out that EDTA might not be such a huge problem.
I guess it also depends on how you're used to work... it was just my opinion :)
by SororSaudade
Fri Jan 12, 2007 5:06 pm
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Chechem and Chaka
Replies: 3
Views: 4143

well, i had never heard about this, so forgive me if i'm not making any sense... but what's their effect on other animals/microrganisms? It could be something related to the fauna that's related to those trees... or maybe not. It could simply have to do with the environment conditions or be a coinci...
by SororSaudade
Fri Jan 12, 2007 4:57 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: dna storage
Replies: 10
Views: 5907

if EDTA is in high concentrations so that it interfers with your PCR reaction you can just simply increase the Mg concentration in the PCR mix. any standard PCR protocol should mention that.
I had some problems with kits for dna purification when using water due to diferences in pH.
by SororSaudade
Wed Dec 20, 2006 9:40 am
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: PCR with only one primer
Replies: 17
Views: 30757

thank you all for your comments, the were very helpful :)
by SororSaudade
Tue Dec 19, 2006 7:14 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: PCR with only one primer
Replies: 17
Views: 30757

that's what I thought... PCR with one primer that anneals at only one site is generally used for sequencing, but not to amplify fragments.

I really didn't know those types of electrophoresis.

Thank you very much :)
by SororSaudade
Tue Dec 19, 2006 12:08 am
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: PCR with only one primer
Replies: 17
Views: 30757

how nice of you... :lol:
by SororSaudade
Mon Dec 18, 2006 9:12 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: PCR with only one primer
Replies: 17
Views: 30757

eheh I know what PCR and electrophoresis are!
Just asked because i could be missing some points and nowadays there are several types of PCR for different purposes.

about electrophoresis... I forgot to mention that I want to separate two products with exactly the same size... :P

thanks :)
by SororSaudade
Mon Dec 18, 2006 5:26 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: PCR with only one primer
Replies: 17
Views: 30757

PCR with only one primer

Hello

Does anyone know if it is posible to do a PCR amplification of a small fragment with only one primer (that anneals only at one site)?
Plus, ideas to separate two possible types of PCR products are more than welcome 8)

Thanks a lot!
by SororSaudade
Sun Dec 17, 2006 12:59 am
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: enzyme denatureization
Replies: 9
Views: 4004

generally low temperatures inactivate enzymes. I don't know if a long time storage can damage them (it happens with DNA). there may be some exceptions, probably.
by SororSaudade
Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:23 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: minimum possible size of a plasmid
Replies: 2
Views: 2229

hummmm

I just wanted to know if a 1,6kb fragment could circularize... :(
can you just post here a reference of one of those plasmids?

Thanks a lot!!

8)